Sunday

They Grow...

At times we get dogs into Clancy’s Dream Rescue that could be compared to a blank sheet of paper no matter how old they are.  What I mean, there is no structure or obedience, and some are just a bundle of joy bouncing everywhere, but others come with a heavy heart.  Here are a few things I have observed.



From the dog's point of view.

I have learned that there is more space than a 6-foot area of dirt and a chain
I have learned that you can keep warm in the winter
I have learned you can go into the house
I have learned I can eat every day
I have learned to go up and down stairs
I have learned what a human is
I have learned what a toy is
I have learned what a bath is
I have learned what other dogs are
I have learned what peace is
I have learned what trust is
I have learned what hope is
I have learned what love is

When you rescue a dog, it can be overwhelming, and every time, I get a queasy stomach because of what we run into.  Each dog is different and reacts in many ways.  Some are eager to see you, and some are apprehensive, but most haven’t a clue of how their life is about to chance.  Every point of view, I have seen and some I have seen them all.  As most of us are dog lovers, we may have never seen these points of view and can’t imagine ever seeing them, but in my world, I have.  I can tell you when I go to a shelter, I will whisper to the All Mighty, “Please let me be able to save this dog.”  And when the dog is in the car, I have cried to him, “how can this happen because it was to bad.”

From my point of view.

I have seen you run at the farm, something you have never done
I have learned that you love to be in the house and sleep in the bed  
I have fed you every day
I have taught you to go up and down stairs
I have seen you love humans
I have seen you play with a toy
I have given you a bath
I have seen you play with other dogs
I have seen you at peace
I have seen you trust
I have seen you now have hope
I have learned what love is


Doing this rescue thing can be hard at times, there is never an easy one, and some are more complicated than others.  I have literally seen a dog run for the first time off lead or have a soft bed that is not the ground but is usually is in our bed.  They are safe inside the house during the rain and not sleeping in the snow.  You would be surprised because of their lack of socialization that it’s hard for them to meet strangers and most don’t know how to go up or down a set of stairs.  Once they do it, it’s usually Okay, but the easiest way for me is to pick them up, holding them tight and speaking softly, set them down in the middle with them.  Once there I talk and encourage them to move, and they do.  When the pack goes up or down the next time, without any hesitation, the new dog will follow.


It’s heartwarming to see a dog blossom into something that would benefit there life and the life of there new dog parents after the rescue, and sometimes it’s pretty easy, and at times it takes a little longer.   The most difficult situations are when you can’t help a dog and unfortunately, we can’t.  Monday morning I am traveling to eastern Indiana to evaluate a dog as we do every week to see if it fits into our program and as I sit in the car getting ready to go in, I will whisper to the All Mighty, “Please let me be able to save this dog.”   Ken