Sunday

It's "OK" I'm here...

Crack.....Bang......Crash.......As soon as I hear the thunder, I know she will look for me.  Even if it's distant, here she comes with her head lowered toward the ground and walking very fast.  For what ever reason, she is scared of storms and thunder.  It's not as bad as some of the other dogs I have read about, but you have to feel sorry for her, she seems so helpless.  She will demand to come into the house and go right for a safe spot, either in the walk-in closet or in a far corner of the basement.  Today, we had a storm blow up and I was ready to go to church, I tried to persuade her to go to the kennel, however she would not move, she again lowered her head and batted those eyes and every possible way said "please don't make me go outside".  Well I didn't have the heart to make her.  I went and got a dog bed and brought it to the bedroom where the walk-in closet is and set it down.  She sprang to it and made a few circles as if digging a hole and making herself smaller and laid down.  She was in and she knew it.  I said "be good, I'll be back soon"  She again batted her eyes and and licked my hand as if to say "Thank You"  If you don't know by now, it's Dutchess.  She is the most emotional dog I have ever seen.  She is truly passionate about life and everything around it, she does live life to the fullest. 

What some experts say...
What You Can Do to Help
Create a Safe Place: Try to create a safe place for your dog to go to when she hears the noises that frighten her. But remember, this must be a safe location from her perspective, not yours. Notice where she goes, or tries to go, when she's frightened, and if at all possible, give her access to that place. If she's trying to get under your bed, give her access to your bedroom.
You can also create a "hidey hole" that is dark, small, and shielded from the frightening sound as much as possible. Encourage her to go there when you're home and the thunder or other noise occurs. Consider using a fan or radio near the spot to help block out the sound. Feed her in that location and help your dog associate that spot with other "good things" happening to her there. She must be able to come and go from this location freely. Confining her in the "hidey hole" when she doesn't want to be there will only cause more problems. The "safe place" approach may work with some dogs, but not all. Some dogs are motivated to move and be active when frightened and "hiding out" won't help them feel less fearful.

There are a lot of other things you can do and a lot of dogs suffer from this and it can be a real problem.  For more info, just 'Google" it......or call me.

A lot of people have asked, how is Shepp is doing? here is an email from his owner..
Kenny,  Hope all are doing well.  SHEPP is doing fantastic!! As a matter of fact he just walked in the office to visit. The grandchildren went swimming in the lake and Shepp went them with a little assistance. He is now venturing out on his own. He is becoming much more familiar with his surroundings, but with a whistle and a SHEPP he is right back at your side. Shepp definitely loves playing ball, but only returns the bright green ones.  Shepp is also becoming a fisherman, daily outings to the dock with the grandson . Caught four catfish, two bass, and a mess of bluegills yesterday. Did I mention Shepp loves playing ball!!  Shepp and I went up to the neighbors last night. Shepp and the neighbor dog are becoming best friends, anything the granddaughter threw, the two went bounding after.  Kenny I truly hope you are happy with the decision you had to make, because this family and Shepp are very, very happy with the one you have made.

In my heart, I will always love Shepp and he will always have a special place there.  Run Free Shepp..."I am dad, I am".......

This is the last photo I took of him, he left us, about an hour after this.......